elephant in the garden



I've taken many photos of the back garden since starting the blog. Now that the garden is basically established, it doesn't change that much any more. There's always lots to be done, but it's basically more about filling gaps than creating gaps.

Of course a garden is part of nature and nature is always changing. Plants die or become overcrowded. Volunteer seedlings appear and decisions need to be made.  - to keep, transplant, give away or compost?  Trees and shrubs keep growing, and may outgrow their original position. The large Acacia was pushing the fence over and my neighbours requested it go. So it went - to compost and mulch heaven - leaving behind a bare fence with lots of extra light and lots of delicious planting opportunities.


I'm not good at growing flowers. Except in spring, there's rarely much colour here, apart from greens and greys. The charm of this garden is subtle. For interest and variety it depends on different shades of green and grey, and different shaped foliage. Either people see its charm or they don't. The people who don't see its charm seem to see it as a boring mess, not like their idea of a garden at all.

I think it may be thought of as habitat, a habitat garden. Sometimes populated by Elephant.


With a garden that doesn't change much, that already has had lots of photos taken, how can I show it in a new way? I apologize for those who hate kitsch, but the idea is to let Elephant explore the garden, finding comfortable places to rest in, and to show the garden through this lens.

So this is how the back garden is looking this record-breaking wet autumn.








As I write this, autumn leaves from the oak trees that line the street where I live are falling onto the road. I'm off to collect them for mulch to protect and enrich the soil. I need to get to them before they get swept up and collected by the Council truck.  

Comments

  1. I like the idea of using your Elephant to help you and others "see" your garden. I've used my cats to provide a different perspective on my own garden on occasion. My space is more of a flower garden than yours but I'm (slowly) trying to transform it into a more coherent landscape as I determine what works here and what doesn't.

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    1. Hi Kris, good luck with your evolving garden. We gardeners do need to be patient. I have been doing this for nearly 30 years and it's only very recently that it feels established - basically, as much as a garden is ever established. It's like the Red or White Queen - you have to run as fast as you can in order to stay in the same place. I suppose if you want to progress further you have to run twice as fast as you can!

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    2. correction: my maths is not very good. 2017 minus 1979 is 2 years short of 40 years!

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  2. Everyone's idea of the perfect garden is different and that's what's great about gardens, I think. Your garden looks so tranquil and Elephant is certainly finding it restful.

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    1. thank you, I think Elephant and Missy would get on well.

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  3. I enjoyed this very much! You're right--placing the elephant in various locations provides a new perspective on all your luscious garden "rooms." I like all types of gardens, with slight preference for the "calmer" ones ... particularly in a domestic setting. Your garden is beautiful!

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    1. thank you, Beth, it is calm - except in summer when the mosquitoes are buzzing around excitedly!

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  4. A mellow peaceful green space. I'd like to walk down that path, and see what's around the corner. My little stone elephant now lives beneath the lemon tree.

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    1. Our elephants are much more compliant in posing than live cats and dogs. I'd love you to emerge from the cyber world and visit and walk down the path!

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  5. How exciting to have new space to fill with plants! Your garden is just my cup of tea as I love the peaceful feeling of foliage textures and shades of green and gray. The wildlife you've attracted (elephant) seems to be enjoying your garden, not trampling/eating your plants and is a surprisingly good tour guide.

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    1. Thank you, Peter, I am thinking of starting an Elephant training business for gardeners.

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  6. What a peaceful tranquil garden you have created. It must be a lovely space to spend time in.

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    1. Thanks Jane, I just love it, and there is generally so much to look at. Yesterday I saw some tiny bright red toadstools.

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  7. Lovely, and I really like your cuddly friend with the big nose.

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    1. Jason, thank you for commenting, but I must tell you Elephant is very sensitive about the size of her nose!

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  8. Have you tried growing periwinkles now known as violas? I've had great luck with them blooming for 6 months during the warmer months.

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    1. No - I sometimes get Johnny Jump Ups that are a kind of viola, but I will check out periwinkles. I do love the colour blue. Thanks for the suggestion.

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    2. I love Johnny Jump Ups but they like cooler weather. The periwinkles are for the summer and there are lots of luscious colors.

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  9. Hi Catmint, I am one who appreciates your greens and grays and various shaped foliage! I love your path and a new perspective from Elephant. Most of all I appreciate your concern for wildlife.

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    1. Thanks, Deb, that's the wonderfulness of our supportive online community - we share so many values. I am so pleased with the response to Elephant, I think I will ask her to pose in the front garden next.

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