about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

marine environment matters


I call this blog a nature blog, but this is the first post about the marine environment.

Visiting the Melbourne Aquarium is always a wonderful experience.  Like Melbourne Zoo, its aim is to help conserve animals in the natural environment, not just to be an arc for animals extinct in the wild.


I hope my grandsons will be able to see fish, coral and other sea creatures in the wild when they grow up.


Global warming, government policies privileging business over conservation and a plague of plastic bags that kill birds and sea creatures like turtles, are among the risks.



The Australian Marine Conservation Society (ACMS) is dedicated to protecting ocean wildlife and their homes. It's the organization to work with if you want to play a role in advocating for sea creatures.

One recent campaign was to protect 'local' great white, tiger and bull sharks from being killed in Western Australia. The ostensible goal of this policy was to protect swimmers. But sharks are migratory animals, and do not frequent particular beaches. This policy threatened some of our most vulnerable wildlife. Sharks are apex predators, and play a vital role in keeping the seas healthy by keeping other species in balance.

The Western Australia government drew back from this appalling policy of culling sharks using baited drum lines because of public opposition. But the ACMS is still keeping a close eye on the government to make sure it doesn't implement a shark cull by stealth. The policy still allows for large sharks swimming past the Western Australian coast to be killed on sight as they are deemed to be a 'risk to human safety'.



Another campaign is to do something about the rubbish polluting our streets, rivers and seas. Comedian Frank Woodley has made a quirky video about this topic, called Give Frank a Break.




13 comments:

  1. The marine environments cover so much of the earth--we can't neglect them! Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  2. More and more of our coastline is being made into marine conservation areas, but this causes problems for the fishermen who catch our fish. There must be a compromise somewhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My understanding is that it is not ordinary fishermen who are the problem, but those with long lines and nets that scrape the bottom and kill everything for miles around. ACMS gives info to let us know which fish are fished sustainably, so we can make good consumer choices.

      Delete
  3. The release of balloons should be banned and all plastics should contain a packaging deposit. That's my humble opinion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree Denise, all that stands in the way of your proposal is political will.

      Delete
  4. Love this...how awful what we are doing to the majority of the world....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it's scary, I try to look for the glass half full instead of empty ...

      Delete
  5. I wonder if we will ever clean up the oceans from all the debris that went into it after the tsunami in Japan.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We are also concerned about marine ecology here, as we border the Gulf of Mexico. It is terrible when we hear of fish die-offs or see dead marine mammals on the beach.I did not realize that turtles mistake plastic for jellyfish, but your photos show why that can easily happen. Just another reason to avoids plastics as much as possible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Deb, living where you do, it must be terrible to see and hear of the destruction due to the oil industry.

      Delete
  7. I am encouraged, when I read about volunteers at the Silvermine wetland. Monitoring for pollution, and between them and the Council sorting problems ASAP. That in turn helps prevent the spills reaching the sea.

    We are experimenting with shark nets, and we have shark monitors who warn swimmers out of the sea, when they see a shark.

    ReplyDelete

Popular Posts