june 2012 garden update and GBBD (kind of)

I don't know how I'd go in a land of winter snow. It would be a forced rest from gardening, a kind of hibernation like bears and squirrels do. There's no hibernating here. Flowers bloom, weeds grow. The brief appearance of winter sunshine brightens the short days of June. 

The following photos were taken through a window: shadows playing on the blind, visible light on the birdbath and a flock of currawongs eating seeds and playing in a group of tea trees.





Purple Alygyone flowers only last one day. The day I had the camera ready was the day for this flower.


I posted a photo of this Echium wildpretti a couple of months ago.  It is slowly growing, still looking like a sea anemone - but a giant sea anemone now. Worth watching, because after winter (I think) it will suddenly burst into dramatic growth, become very very tall, flower - then die.


I think of that old song Diamonds Are a Girls Best Friend. These raindrops are like diamonds to me, transforming the ordinary into a sparkly, romantic and magical world.


Like E. wildpretti, the Artichokes are biding their time, gathering strength for a big show of growth in autumn. I had them near the Echiums before, but moved them, intertwined them irregularly with Diggers Speedwell (Derwentia perfoliata) to form a rough informal border along a path.


This Smoke Bush 'Velvet Cloak' is putting on a dramatic show before it drops its leaves. When its branches are bare, it will be moved again, for the first time in several years. It is very crowded where it is now, and it's being pushed over by larger trees. I have a better space for it nearby, space to grow and spread.


I never tire of Wallflowers because within their different colour ranges, they have subtle colour combinations. This one is several shades of pink and yellow. Design-wise, it shouldn't work among native plants, but it does.


Elsewhere in my blog I have been very rude about violets. Well, I admit I am inconsistent and changeable. I quite like this bed - it's almost a field of violets, with lots of purple flowers sticking their heads cheerfully above the dense mass of bright green heart-shaped leaves.


Stepping out of my front door the other door the other evening, I was greeted by a ringtail possum couple. The one facing the camera seems quite fat - I wonder if this is a female and whether she is pregnant?



I am linking this to Garden Bloggers Bloom Day hosted by Carol from May Dreams Gardens.

As usual, I am interpreting the GBBD brief very loosely. Many people would not necessarily think of possums, currawongs, shadows on blinds and drops of water as blooms.  But remember what Humpty Dumpty said to Alice? When I use a word ... it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.

Comments

  1. My what interesting blooms you have! I love Magpies. When I lived in Colorado I used to enjoy watching their antics, too. Here, it is the Bluejays. We have a game where I hide peanuts throughout the garden around happy hour and watch the Bluejays from my porch find every one, every time. I love that "sea urchin!" And that you for that rare glimpse of the Alygyone flower!

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    1. dear kathy, I made a mistake - a friend just told me. It's not a magpie, it's a currawong! I'm a bit challenged when it comes to birds - among other things ... I'm going to correct it now ... lovely image of the bluejays sharing happy hour with you.

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  2. We've been doing a Catmint, playing musical chairs in the garden. I have moved the first of 3 roses, and he is redoing the end of the Karoo Koppie so I'm rescuing my succulents while I remember what the unlabelled plants are. And where they no longer ARE!

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    1. I always did worry that it was like a contagious bug. If you've caught it permanently like I have, you're in for a rough ride, with thrills and spills, highs and lows. My front garden is barely visible at the moment, I haven't been able to find the heart to photograph it.

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  3. I just adore that carpet of Violets! That's the effect I'd love to have down the shady side of the driveway garden. Maybe one day! I loved all your blooms today, including the more unusual Magpie and Possum blooms! I really loved the foliage of that Smoke Bush, which is not a common plant up here of course.

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    1. Hi Bernie, Carpets of any plants tend to be wonderful, I think. Would violets grow in your climate? They might, they seem to like the wet. The bird is a currawong, I originally thought it was a magpie, but a dear friend corrected me. The smoke bush foliage colour is nothing short of spectacular.

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  4. Those wallflowers are very pretty and oh what a joy to be confronted by two possums at once. I always enjoy reading your garden posts!

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    1. Hi Leanne, This evening there was only one possum in the same tree, and I hope the other possum is OK. I feel like a worried mother! Thank you so much for the compliment, a few weeks ago I was feeling a bit dejected about the blogging business, but now I'm really enjoying it again.

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  5. I love your possoms, raindrops, and shadow blooms! The raindrop shot is truly magical. Of course, I loved seeing the plants, too! :)

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  6. I love it all. You have a wonderful place with lots of cool critters. That mass grouping of plants is really really nice!!! Enjoy your winter....we are your opposite right now. It's super hot here!!! I was outside gardening for 2 hours tonight....and like you, I couldn't imagine ever having snow again in my life. I can't be indoors....it's too confining and I really love being outside. There is always something to do. Hope you are well. It's always a pleasure reading your blog and insights. Have a great weekend. Chris:)

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    1. Hi Chris, thanks for the comment, it's funny when we are opposite seasons, I never get used to it. Today was 17, sunny, perfect for gardening, but I had other commitments, so couldn't feed my habit!

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  7. Fantastic for a winter garden, lots of lovely flowers for you to enjoy still. Lovely possums, do they do any damage in the garden, are they welcome visitors, or are they a bit of a pain like our grey squirrels?

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  8. they do eat lots in some gardens, and many people hate them, but they are protected by law. they don't usually eat much in my garden apart from scraps from the compost, but they do make their presence felt from time to time. That's fine with me - they can't go to the supermarket like I can. In fact my garden is their supermarket.

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  9. Glad to see Echium wildpretti growing steadily :-D Purple Alygyone flowers? The outstanding bloom is amazing! Btw, I have never heard of this one before either.

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    1. It's also known as Australian native hibiscus. Purple is the usual colour but i also have pink ones.

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  10. Très jolies photos. Bonne journée.

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