about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Monday, 16 April 2012

GBBD - April 2012 garden review

It's autumn, still quite warm, without much rain. Because of my recent surgery, my garden has been left to fend for itself with mixed results. (Actually it should be OK to fend for itself since it's supposed to be a wild naturalized sustainable garden... But sometimes I think it forgets this ...)

Still, there are a few lovely photos to show off for this month's GBBD.

First, a closeup of the yellow fluffy balls that are the flowers of Acacia iteaphylla, or Flinders Ranges Wattle.


Wallflower, or Erisymum cheiri, come in quite a few different colours. I love this particular soft pastel combo. 


Anenome japonica, or Japanese Windflower, such a perfect specimen. (I think Japanese is my favourite aesthetic, although I have never actually been to Japan. I have often virtually visited Japan, via Ruma's extraordinarily beautiful blog, Calligraphy in the Landscape.)


Weaving a delicate picture around a fern is Campanula poscharskyana 'Blue', that to me always sounds more like a cocktail than a flowering plant. It's otherwise known as Serbian Bellflower.


The next 3 photos are strictly from the bee's point of view. The bee doesn't know or care whether this lavender plant is Spanish or English or French. All it cares about is the nectar, and is plea-zzz-zzz-ed to report was of good quality and worth making the beeline for.




This is a very close closeup of the Liriope muscarii flowers, modestly peeping out from below the lower leaves. Reminds me of orchids, or maybe something else ...


Good old reliable Valerian.


Now these rabbits strictly speaking don't belong in a monthly update or GBBD. Because chances are you'll find them in exactly the same position next month. There are people who call them kitch, but I recommend them if you want rabbits that don't eat the garden and won't make baby rabbits that eat the garden.




Thanks Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting this meme.


19 comments:

  1. Beautiful! Lovely blog! I have just discovered you, and I'm a new follower!
    Best,
    Anne ♥

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  2. I did not know you had a surgery. Hope you are healing well. I just bought my first batch of native Australian plants last weekend when Adelaide ABC gardening had a fall market here. But I still don't remember their name. Learning...learning...:). I lived in Japan for 6 years and if I have a chance again I will like to live there again. Your garden is really doing well.

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  3. Hope you feel better. I think looking closer at the flowers and wildlife is really important.

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  4. Your wattle is so pretty; I've just planted Acacia fimbriata and can't wait for it to flower down the track! Your bee shots are fantastic; very brave of you to go in close like that :) Best wishes for a rapid recovery.

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  5. I hope your recovery is going well, Catmint. It looks as if your garden is doing very well despite your lack of attention. Loved the Acacia bloom, and that very pretty Wallflower. You've got lots of lovely blooms I will never get to see other than in your garden photos.

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  6. Lovely autumn garden...hope you are feeling better soon! Happy GBBD!

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  7. Hope you are well on your way to recovery. Loved your blooms and surely that is the best form of rabbit available, except for maybe in a stew.

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  8. wild naturalised and sustainable. When my garden grows up, that is what it aspires to!

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  9. Catmint, are any of your plants flowering out of season? After our strange Summer, some of mine seem to think it's spring. I have Ajuga reptans flowering its head off and Callistemon viminalis flowering again too.

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  10. Do hope that you are improving Catmint after your "op". I'm finding that gardens cope very well without us as long as you don't look too closely, then you don't see the weeds!
    Lovely photos of your autumn flowers and your bee!

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  11. Love the rabbits! That anemone is just gorgeous. Love the bee photos, too. I hope you are recovering well, and are back in your garden soon.

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  12. Great photos Catmint - I especially love the fluffy flowers in the first photo!
    Hope you've recovered from your surgery now and are feeling better:)

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  13. Gorgeous pics Catmint, Autumn is a lovely time of year and the weather has been very bee friendly I notice. We have hundreds in our flowering gum.
    Take care.:-)

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  14. Your garden fends very well ... beautiful! I love the Acacia! I need some of those rabbits. My bunny eats like a horse!

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  15. You have flowers that I see only see them here! Love that soft pastel combo of wallflower the most. Oh so sweet :-D Those bees haha... they are so hungry! Nonetheless, it is good to see the garden through your lens. Happy recovery.

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  16. Beautiful anemone! And the bee photos are always fun, if you can catch them in focus, eh? In the past weeks I've shared catmint with a bunch of friends. Spreading your namesake around the neighborhood . . . .

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  17. Well don to your garden for being so understanding ,lovely photos.

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  18. I hope you're feeling better soon. :o) Love the yellow fluff balls! I need to swap my bunnies for your bunnies. I doubt yours would eat my toad lilies.

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  19. Dear all, thanks for the visits, good wishes and comments. I am getting better, and it's getting closer to the time I will be able to dig again - can't wait!

    Thanks for the compliment Anne.

    Diana, enjoy your first batch of native plants. They are different - more subtle beauty often compared to others. Good luck with learning the names. I learned them once, then forgot lots, so have to keep learning anyway.

    Hi Hermes, I agree - we learn so much by observing.

    Leanne, I'm not familiar with that Acacia - hope you show it to us when it flowers. I'm not scared of bees, only wasps make me nervous.

    thanks Bernie

    thanks Donna

    Alastair, now that is a sensible solution to the rabbit problem as long as one isn't vegetarian. My rabbits would not stew well.

    HI Diana, great to share aspirations.

    Dear Lyn, I haven't noticed any plants flowering out of season. I hope your Ajuga and Callistemon work out their confusion.

    Hi Pauline, I suppose weeds can grow and be pulled out at a later date.

    thanks Holley

    thanks Nutty

    HI Serena, I still don't have as many bees as I used to have. But there are quite a few.

    HI Kathy, see Alastair's comment / suggestion re buuny problem??????

    thanks steph, I love those wallflower shades so much too.

    Hi VW, thank you for spreading my namesake around. Yes, I'm proud that I managed to get the bees in focus. First time. With my little non DSLR.

    thanks Cathy, we've built up a good relationship, my garden and I - on the whole ...

    Hi CM, if my bunnies ate your toad lilies, now wouldn't that be scary!

    cheers, cm

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