about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Wednesday, 18 May 2011

a flower sandwich

These are the nests of the Osmia avosetta bee. They consist of two thin layers of petals stuck together by a layer of mud.
The Osmia avosetta bee is a rare solitary bee that is found in Iran and Turkey. The female bee builds the nest and deposits stores of nectar and pollen inside it. Then the bee lays the egg and seals the nest with mud. When the egg hatches the larva feasts on the food.

This picture was published in the Haptic Blog, the blog of Emily Fischer and Haptic Lab, as well as in Jenny Davidson's blog Light Reading. Jenny said the nests reminded her of Titania's bower.

If you didn't know bees made the nests, you might think they were made by fairies.

9 comments:

  1. Aren't they something! What a beautiful creation. I've never seen anything like it.

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  2. What gorgeous little treasures. ^_^

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  3. How pretty, they really are unusual, isn't nature wonderful.polan

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  4. A flower sandwich sounds delectable. I suppose you know of our local blue banded bee, Catmint, also solitary? I've seen them at home. Also, do you know of this site:
    www.aussiebee.com.au
    All the best, and I hope things are developing well for your garden opening.

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  5. Like a handicraft or souvenir when you go travel to an exotic country. A work of art by the bees.

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  6. I certainly didn't know. How very unusual.

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  7. They are works of art. I think the baby bee must be a big bee to fill up the nest.

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  8. I'd never guess. Interesting1 And colorful!

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  9. Dear cyberfriends, I am so pleased you like the bee art too. Faisal, thanks for the link to the Australian bee webpage - I didn't know about it, and learned that most bees in Australia are solitary. cheers, catmint

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