about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Tuesday, 26 October 2010

acknowledging the original owners of the land

In Brunswick, an inner northern suburb of Melbourne, there is a small park. At first sight it looks like any other park. It has grassy spaces, a few trees, seats, a drinking fountain and play equipment for children. What makes this park special is this ... in one inconspicuous corner of the park is an indigenous garden.


In this garden there is rock art to wonder at and enjoy.


There are Australian native plants like this Lomandra and there are old trees with interesting bark.


A fun way to introduce the youngest generation to indigenous culture.

10 comments:

  1. What wonderful pictures and such a good place.

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  2. Dear Catmint, What an imaginative and splendid idea. This is well worth copying by any number of municipal authorities as it is, as you say, so important to introduce young people to their heritage.

    I love the rock art and think that this works very well alongside the indigenous plantings.

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  3. I guess it just seems normal to you, but your Australian flora and fauna still seems so exotic to me. How nice to have a part to preserve and present it.
    And you're heading into summer - I hope it's not too hot and not too dry this year!

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  4. That young boy so cute ;-) He looks like he is interested in something.

    Those images drawn on the rock is captivating. The kangaroo has a broken leg. Probably a hunting place for people and the boomerang is the weapon... he he.. just imagining ;-)

    Nice park btw. Have a pleasant evening!

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  5. The tree bark is very interesting! Local trees?

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  6. Nice place. And nice shirt on that little cutie pie!

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  7. i love the message at the entrance of the park.

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  8. Great post Catmint! I am sorry I missed it till now. It is only right to at least create a corner of all parks to honor the native peoples and plants. You are right that it is a good way to teach our young about native cultures and it is also good for the native peoples to show their children their heritage. So many were persecuted if they did not give up their native languages and customs. WEll Done! ;>)

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  9. Hi Hermes, thanks for the comment.

    Dear Edith, some local government bodies do seem to have imagination, in this case allowing the local indigenous traditional owners of the land to display a bit of their culture.

    Hi VW, I know that we have special flora and fauna that are not found elsewhere, and feel a deep connection to the landscape. Thanks for your good wishes, we are all scared re what summer will bring.

    Hi Stephanie, love your imagined story based on the rock art!

    Hi Cheryl, I don't know what the trees are but I am sure they are indigenous to the local area.

    Hi Grace, interesting that you noticed the T shirt on my grandson. It was a present from California!

    Hi Wendy, yes - the message is very special, there is a sort of timelessness in it.

    Hi Carol, thanks for your comment. In Australia the indigenous people are very disadvantaged and successive governments have failed to help them.

    Cheers, catmint

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  10. That is lovely. I adore taking Imogen to gardens, and I'm chuffed that she enjoys them even though she's so young. I must look into the indigenous aspect and start to teach her.

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