about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Sunday, 1 August 2010

glimpses of the winter garden

greens and greys and a touch of yellow ...


side looking fuller


elegant euphorbia rigida


possums still snacking


caterpillars also snacking


heavenly hellebore


potter posing


either erysmium or cheiranthus


xerochrysum bractateatum


perfect parahebe perfoliata

6 comments:

  1. Dear Catmint, Your garden is looking good in the depths of winter. The Euphorbias in particular are very dramatic and add a superb structure to the borders. And, Hellebores, my absolute favourite. So strange for me to be seeing them in August but a wonder of the Blogosphere is to see most things all year round somewhere!!

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  2. What's your secret? Everything looks so healthy:)

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  3. So love your dog posing - what a star. Wish my winter garden ever looked like that. What a lovely place you have.

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  4. I just love Euphorbia rigida and their chartreuse blooms. I haven't seen parahebe perfoliata before - I just love the delicate flower :-)

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  5. Hi Edith, thanks for your comment. Christmas day here is often so hot we have cold turkey and then rush off to the beach!

    Hi Rorebot, firstly we have had a very wet winter, so the garden is extra lush. Secondly I think it is keeping up the mulch and compost. Now it's no longer a secret. (lol)

    Thanks Hermes, from your photo I see you are a dog lover too. We are lucky here because even though it's winter it never gets below zero and often it gets to 14 or 15 (centigrade)

    Hi Noelle, The parahebe is also called Diggers Speedwell, and is an Australian native. The leaves look a bit like acacia but the shape is different. It seems to prefer a bit of water but has survived the hot summers.

    Cheers, catmint

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  6. Such a beautiful garden! I have many of dahlias in my garden, but my garden is so tiny.

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