about this blog



I started this blog in 2008. It started mainly as a way of tracking the evolution of my dry garden, and that led to an interest in photography and in the creatures that live in the garden. It's still about the garden and wildlife, but now my passion is thinking about how we humans can learn to co-exist with wild animals and plants, especially in urban areas.

Monday, 28 January 2008

change



This is definitely a new experience for me. As far as an online community is concerned I am a hermit at present, but one who is committed to slow but inevitable change - so who knows what will happen?

About change: I love it when people say they love the garden, and it is looking pretty good at present - to my eyes / aesthetic. But this garden project has been going for more than 30 years and has been through many changes, as has the weather and the environment (like the removal of trees in the neighbourhood as people replace their rambling eclectic gardens with patios, pots and a careful selection from the 10 trees or shrubs currently in demand and produced and marketed by and for the gardening industry).

It seems that in order to keep the garden looking good, I need to keep up with the changes, by meeting them and adapting or changing stuff in response. A bit like the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland - who had to run fast on the spot if she wanted to stay in the same place.

For example, the kiwi fruit vine currently requires much thought. (You can see it in the 2 photos above). It was lush for years and years, but an increase in hot weather and a decrease in rain without compensatory water has left it somewhat dessicated and shrivelled. Actually one has died. I'm not sure whether it is the male or female plant but no matter - this plant is traditional and quaint, and needs a mother and father plant to produce fruit.

About a year ago I planted Pandorea Jasminoides - an Australian native evergreen climber with pink flowers. Once established I think it will be vigorous without water. It is growing but very very slowly and so far is not visible to a casual eye. In spring I may plant a couple more at various intervals. And maybe in time (slow) this not very attractive structure may support something beautiful.

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