about this blog



This blog tracks the ongoing changes of my garden, and the wildlife I try to attract to it. It's a nature blog. It contains my thoughts and musings about anything and everything to do with nature - gardening, book reviews, philosophy, travel, science, history, art, design, politics.
Catmint is my signature plant because it has all the qualities I value in a plant: resilience, beauty and the capacity to spread prolifically . Unfortunately it's not indigenous. If I was starting again I'd probably choose an indigenous plant.

Monday, 16 January 2012

garden bloggers bloom day, Jan 2012

Last year was the second year in a row that the local weather office recorded above average rainfall after 13 years of below average rainfall.  I planned for drought, now I'm spending time just watching the garden to see how it grows in this unexpected wet.  Busy, as well as not feeling exactly crash hot, when I have time and energy I mainly concentrate on liberating overgrown paths. And reading the camera manual because I am still doggedly (catmintilly?) trying to improve my photographs and am an extremely challenged and slow learner in the field of photography.

The colour's bizarre here but I must show off the yellow tomatos that seeded themselves in the garden. It would be so wonderful if they naturalized and became like wild bush tomatoes.


My War Against Agapanthus continues, and mostly now they grace the compost heap.


After a feast of pecan nuts I chucked the shells on the garden, including a few that hadn't opened. Somehow an enterprising spider managed to open one and placed the half with the nut intact, high in a lavender bush suspended by its web. The spider is living behind the nut.


 I thought the pokers in the front garden were orange but this yellow one appeared. Although it's beautiful I didn't think it went with the pink and orange and blue colour scheme. So as soon as it let its guard and drooped, I dug it up and gave it to C. who is starting a new garden.


The wallflowers are still blooming, I guess because they like the rain, but also because I am learning to give less them less active care, and more passive appreciation.


Different coloured love-in-the mist with valerian and Californian poppies in the background.


 Sage plants with large leaves provide contrast to green foliage and pink penstemons,


and all the while the goddess watches over the garden.


Thanks Carol from May Dreams Gardens for this meme.

18 comments:

  1. Beautiful blooms! Love your goddess, and how funny about the spider that's recycling the nut! I hope you get plenty of rain, but not too much!

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  2. A very enterprising spider indeed! That is really something. Love the yellow poker.

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  3. its looking so lush Catmint! I love your technical design speak! Good luck with the cmaera.

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  4. Enjoy the unexpected rain catmint. I also keep beating myself up over my camera expertise, expertise, who am I kidding.

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  5. I'm still 'doggedly' (no dogs here!) resisting reading the camera manual. Sob! It's all Greek to me, no idea where to start.

    My Kniphofia, bought for yellow, is an opens orange then fades to yellow. With your rain, I see an enviably GREEN garden.

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  6. Your drought tolerant plants seem to be enjoying all the rain. Your garden is looking so very lovely. It's always such a joy to see your planting combinations and how well they work. How clever is that spider?

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  7. How innovative of that spider - so interesting. What a beautiful garden you have been toiling. I love the pokers and will eventually add a variety hardy enough for my area. You have to love blooms that do best when left to thrive for themselves. I really like the contrast of your sage leaves. I also love the goddess sculpture!

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  8. Wonderful blooms and beautiful garden! I hope the unexpected wet is going to be longer for you ;-) I would love to be in your position. Enjoying the pretty flowers and greeneries flourishing well and abundantly :-D

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  9. I'm glad to see reports from the other side of the equator where it's not at all wintery... Enjoy the wet and your summer blooms.

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  10. Good luck with the agapanthus war! I've noticed it really spreading into bushland in our area this year. Beautiful photos Catmint, I'm rubbish at combining colours in the garden, but yours look lovely :)

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  11. I am always fascinated by a plant that is a weed in one country and thought delicate in another. I gave up on Agapanthus because they were so unreliable!
    I admire the Pecan spider - such ingenuity. It obviously realised you were going to get more rain than usual.

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  12. What a sensible spider, it knew it was going to rain so found a shelter! Your garden looks as though it has appreciated the rain, it looks so colourful and pretty. Your yellow poker is just what I need in my bee and butterfly border, along with your agapanthus!!!

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  13. When I lived in California Agapanthus was all over, but here in Washington State it only makes a modest showing. We just had 8 inches of snow and the gardens look good dressed in white. Yes, your colors combine well in your garden.

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  14. Whatever you regard your photography skills to be, Catmint, I kind of like seeing the process. The photos are beautiful. I feel that I've been on a nature study tour, and this is really much more satisfying and engaging than being presented with a stream of 'perfect' views.

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  15. The tomato photo is just lovely, good job, photographer! When we moved to mild California, lots of gardeners there turned up their noses at agapanthus, too. But I always loved it. I guess 3 years wasn't long enough to get sick of it. Now I'm back where it's too cold to grow agapanthus and so many others, and I miss them :-)

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  16. what lovely photos. I am great with composition, but alas, should really take the time to read the manual too. I've tried to take some shortcut classes, but the techniques never stick b/c it's so much easier to set the camera to automatic, isn't it! I told myself I would make it a goal to put it on manual to force myself to learn, but I don't have the time or patience (or either).

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  17. dear cyberfriends, thank you so much for your comments, wonderful, encouraging and stimulating as always. Now I'm off to visit your blogs ... cheers, catmint

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  18. Hi Catmint,

    No stress with the camera:) It will happen when it happens. Your wildflowers are lovely and I'm looking forward to our wildflower season here. It should be spectacular. Started working outside again as temps are warming up. Can't wait. Hope you're having a good weekend. Chris

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I love to get feedback and comments, and getting to know other bloggers. I also appreciate corrections if you detect an error, because I'm not an expert, but a self taught enthusiastic amateur on a steep learning curve.

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